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Wednesday, November 22, 2017

Tuesday, November 21, 2017

Monday, November 20, 2017

Sunday, November 19, 2017

Saturday, November 18, 2017

Thursday, November 16, 2017

Wednesday, November 15, 2017

Tuesday, November 14, 2017

Monday, November 13, 2017

Sunday, November 12, 2017

Saturday, November 11, 2017

Friday, November 10, 2017

Thursday, November 9, 2017

Wednesday, November 8, 2017

Tuesday, November 7, 2017

Monday, November 6, 2017

Sunday, November 5, 2017

Friday, November 3, 2017

Thursday, November 2, 2017

Wednesday, November 1, 2017

Tuesday, October 31, 2017

Monday, October 30, 2017

Sunday, October 29, 2017

Saturday, October 28, 2017

Friday, October 27, 2017

Thursday, October 26, 2017

Wednesday, October 25, 2017

Monday, October 23, 2017

Jesse James Jump


This mural is in Garretson, SD where Jesse James jumped the Devil's Gulch in 1876 while being chased by a posse of twenty armed men, or so the story goes. He was fleeing his gang's raid on the bank in Northfield, MN. Theoretically this jump is possible. The gap is reported to be between 18-20 feet, and horses have jumped over 27 feet. But the consequences for missing this jump is a plunge of six stories to Split Rock Creek into a pool said to be bottomless. Members of the posse claimed they saw Jesse make this jump and they did not dared to follow. A month later Jesse James returned home to Missouri. 

Saturday, October 21, 2017

Friday, October 20, 2017

Thursday, October 19, 2017

Wednesday, October 18, 2017

Monday, October 16, 2017

Sunday, October 15, 2017

Saturday, October 14, 2017

Friday, October 13, 2017

Thursday, October 12, 2017

Wednesday, October 11, 2017

Tuesday, October 10, 2017

Monday, October 9, 2017

Sunday, October 8, 2017

Turbin House


This is the ruins of the Queen Bee Mill that initiated the town of Sioux Falls, SD. There is a story here. A number of locals wanted to build a mill using the water that flowed over the falls, but the Minneapolis bankers were not willing to invest money for building the mill unless they could see that there was enough water to power a mill through the dry summer months when rain became intermittent. The bankers traveled to see the falls in the later summer. They were expected, so the locals built a temporary dam upstream from the falls and arranged to have the dam removed just before the bankers went to measure the water flow. Was this fraud? Most certainly it was, but they got the money to build this mill because the flow of water over the falls was substantial. Unfortunately the Queen Bee Mill only operated for about a year as there was insufficient grain grown locally to keep it in full operation. While the mill closed, the town of Sioux Falls became well established.

Saturday, October 7, 2017